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How to Write an Employment Verification Letter

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Posted by: David Garcia January 02, 2024

Employment verification is essential to organizations such as lenders, new employers, and more. It’s crucial for those tasked with writing them to understand how to articulate and send this verification.

Below, learn what an employment verification letter is, when it’s required, what it should include, and find sample letters.

What Is an Employment Verification Letter?

An employment verification letter is a document that confirms an employee is currently or was previously employed at a certain company. This type of letter is typically written by an employer or an employer’s HR department at the request of an employee or third party, such as a landlord or financial institution.

An employment verification letter may contain information such as the employee’s job title, start date, hours worked, salary, and more.

The information included depends on why the third party needs the verification and what information your organization and applicable laws allow you to disclose.

When Are Employment Verification Letters Required?

Employment verification letters may be required for a variety of reasons. If you receive a request for an employment verification letter, it could be because of the following:

  • Applying for a loan or mortgage
  • Renting an apartment or house
  • Applying for government assistance
  • Immigration purposes
  • Verifying income for child support payments
  • Requesting loan payment reduction or deferral
  • Pursuing an opportunity with a new employer

Note that the employee requesting the verification isn’t required to disclose why they need this letter. However, they should generally provide the information that the third party requires and the best contact information to ensure appropriate delivery of the letter.

What Should Be Included in an Employment Verification Letter?

Certain information is often included when writing an employment verification letter. However, the actual information you include usually depends on your organization’s policies and the laws in your state regarding what you’re legally allowed to disclose, as well as what information the requesting third party is looking for in the letter. 

Check with your HR representative prior to creating the letter; ensure you’re not violating any policies and that your HR department reviews all information. Don’t include additional information that wasn’t requested in the letter. In addition, the employee may need to sign a release form prior to you being able to share information with the third party. 

Beyond your company’s official letterhead, which should always be included, many employment verification letters include the following information:

  • The employee’s full name
  • Employer name
  • Employer address
  • Name and address of the third party requesting the letter
  • Job title (and description – optional)
  • Employment start date (and end date if applicable)
  • Current or final salary
  • Reason for termination (if applicable)

Other information that may or may not need to be included in an employment verification letter includes:

  • Hours worked per week (full-time or part-time)
  • Any additional compensation details (bonuses, commissions, etc.)

It’s important to confirm that you’re in compliance with applicable laws when deciding what to disclose, and your organization may also have a policy regarding releasing employment information. Make sure you’re only sharing information that should be shared.

Delivery of the letter also matters. Does the requesting party want a physical letter, or is a digital letter an emailed letter satisfactory? If using a standard printed letter, stick with a formal business letter format featuring your company’s information and the requesting company’s information at the top.

Keep these letters brief. They’re intended to provide essential information and don’t need to feature many extra details. Keep it between 50-100 words if possible.

Employment Verification Letter Samples

Employment Verification for a Current Employee

Your Organization Name

Your Organization Address and Contact Information

Date

Requesting Party Name

Requesting Party Address and Contact Information

Dear [Requesting Party’s Name],

This letter is to confirm the employment status of [Employee’s Full Name] at [Company Name]. [He/She] has been employed with us since [Start Date] and currently holds the position of [Job Title], in which [he/she] is responsible for [include job description].

Optional: [He/She] works [full-time/part-time], approximately [Hours Per Week], and receives a salary of [Salary Amount] per year.

If you require additional information, please do not hesitate to contact us at [contact info].

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

[Company Name]

Employment Verification for a Past Employee

Your Organization Name

Your Organization Address and Contact Information

Date

Requesting Party Name

Requesting Party Address and Contact Information

Dear [Requesting Party’s Name],

This letter is to confirm the past employment of [Employee’s Full Name] with [Company Name]. [He/She] was employed with us from [Start Date] to [End Date], during which time [he/she] held the position of [Job Title], in which [he/she] was responsible for [include job description].

Optional: During their employment, [he/she] worked [full-time/part-time], approximately [Hours Per Week], and received a salary of [Salary Amount] per year.

Optional: Their employment with our organization was terminated due to [termination reason].

If you require additional information, please do not hesitate to contact us at [contact info].

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

[Company Name]

Final Thoughts

Employment verification letters are important documents that serve as proof of current or previous employment and sometimes proof of income for individuals. For those writing them, it’s important to understand what information can be disclosed and how to format this letter correctly. Ensure your organization complies with applicable laws and protects sensitive employee information. 

Need employment verification services for your business? Contact us at ScoutLogic for more information!

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